Lexington Clinic is working alongside state and federal officials to develop a COVID-19 vaccination distribution strategy for the communities it serves. We will receive allocations of the vaccines as they become available.
 
At Lexington Clinic, the health and safety of our patients, staff and community remain our top priority, as we continuously monitor and assess information on COVID-19 vaccines. We understand that you may have many questions and concerns regarding the vaccines. We aim to provide you with accurate and quick updates as they become available. Please keep visiting this page for updated information.
 
January 21, 2021
 
Dear Patients,
 
Lexington Clinic is committed to offering the best in healthcare to our community, including preventative steps against COVID-19. At the moment, Lexington Clinic does not have COVID-19 vaccine available for the general public. Unfortunately, we do not anticipate getting the supplies until sometime in the spring. Therefore, if you have the opportunity to receive the vaccinations elsewhere, we encourage you to take advantage of it.
 
When vaccine inventory is such that Lexington Clinic will be included in the state’s distribution plans, our plan of action and communication will reflect that availability. Please check for the latest updates by returning to this page regularly. We request that you do not call your provider's office to ask if we have the vaccine.
 
Thank you for your patience and understanding.
 
Sincerely,
Lexington Clinic

Benefits of Getting Vaccinated

We understand that some people may be concerned about getting vaccinated once a COVID-19 vaccine is available in the United States. While these vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.
 
BENEFITS
  • COVID-19 vaccination will help keep you from getting COVID-19
  • COVID-19 vaccines are being carefully evaluated in clinical trials and will be authorized or approved only if they make it substantially less likely you’ll get COVID-19.
  • Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.
  • Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Experts continue to conduct more studies about the effect of COVID-19 vaccination on severity of illness from COVID-19, as well as its ability to keep people from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.
FACTS ABOUT COVID-19 VACCINES
  • COVID-19 vaccines will not give you COVID-19
  • COVID-19 vaccines will not cause you to test positive on COVID-19 viral tests
  • People who have gotten sick with COVID-19 may still benefit from getting vaccinated
  • Getting vaccinated can help prevent getting sick with COVID-19
  • Receiving an mRNA vaccine will not alter your DNA
 
HOW COVID-19 VACCINES WORK
COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection, but with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future.
 
It typically takes a few weeks for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes after vaccination. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection.
 
Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.
FAQs ABOUT COVID-19 VACCINATION

Information on this page, as well as our main homepage, will be updated as we learn more about our distribution plans and determine if and when we can begin vaccinating patients.

 All but one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the United States need two shots to be effective. The other COVID-19 vaccine uses one shot.

Yes. CDC recommends that during the pandemic people wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth when in contact with others outside your household, when in healthcare facilities, and when receiving any vaccine, including a COVID-19 vaccine. Anyone who has trouble breathing or is unable to remove a mask without assistance should not wear a mask. For more information, visit considerations for wearing masks.

There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again; this is called natural immunity. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. Until we have a vaccine available and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices makes recommendations to CDC on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines, CDC cannot comment on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, and staying at least 6 feet away from others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations for how to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on steps everyone should take to slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

There is not enough information currently available to say if or when CDC will stop recommending that people wear masks and avoid close contact with others to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before making that decision. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

There are currently no available vaccines that will prevent COVID-19. However, multiple agencies and groups in the United States are working together to make sure that a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine is available as quickly as possible.

A flu vaccine will not protect you from getting COVID-19, but it can prevent you from getting influenza (flu) at the same time as COVID-19. This can keep you from having a more severe illness. While it’s not possible to say with certainty what will happen in the winter, CDC believes it’s likely that flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading during that time. That means that getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever.

The protection someone gains from having an infection (called natural immunity) varies depending on the disease, and it varies from person to person. Since this virus is new, we don’t know how long natural immunity might last. Some early evidence—based on some people— seems to suggest that natural immunity may not last very long.

Regarding vaccination, we won’t know how long immunity lasts until we have a vaccine and more data on how well it works.

Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

For full information on the COVID-19 Vaccine, please visit the CDC's Frequently Asked Questions about the COVID-19 Vaccine.

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Lexington Clinic is Central Kentucky’s largest and oldest medical group. With 180+ providers in more than 30 specialties, we have been taking care of 600,000+ visits annually in the Lexington community since 1920.

1221 South Broadway
Lexington, Kentucky

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